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Shannon Rupp

Facebook is getting old, in every sense of the word.

Since early 2009, when Facebook trumpeted the fact that the female 55+ demographic grew by 550 per cent, (while underplaying the fact that the under-30 enthusiasm stagnated), I've been amused to see it evolving into the equivalent of the retirement home's social centre.

Women who used to scrapbook are now farming on Facebook and sending us all tiresome updates. (PopCap Games reports that 60 per cent of FarmVille's 82 million users are women over 40.)

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The Royal Winnipeg Ballet’s current tour of Giselle, which opens in Vancouver tonight, looks suspiciously like Evelyn Hart’s unofficial farewell tour. But it’s best not to mention the “R” word to her -- that’s retirement. Although she will be 46 in April, Hart says that the idea of beginning any performance knowing that it will be “The Last One,” is more stress than she can bear.

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“Could you love a cock that kills?” is the kind of line that has been getting a laugh since Chaucer made the pun and, as always, it drew whoops when battery opera worked it into their latest performance art piece, Spektator.

 The audience also howled when Jennifer Murray, kneeling, stuck her naked butt in the air in a pose so revealing it prompted a colleague to murmur: “Nice Brazilian!”

And spectators guffawed when, as the dead cock, Murray’s naked body was dragged off-stage.

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Barbara Ehrenreich's latest masterful book, Bright-Sided, opens with the most hopeful frontpiece I've seen in decades. "To complainers everywhere: Turn up the volume!"

Ehrenreich subtitles the book How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking has Undermined America, and she investigates how the 19th century's faith-healing movement developed into today's pop culture tool for social control.

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Blacks protested Show Boat, Asians objected to Miss Saigon, so why-oh-why haven’t the Irish started a donnybrook over Lord of the Dance? It’s certainly tacky enough to constitute a national insult.

Despite a fellow critics’ claim that PBS is running a tape-loop of Irish tapstravaganzas, I had never seen Lord of the Dance. So I was in for a rude shock on opening night at General Motors Place.

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Depending on whom you talk to, the recent Tap Dogs show (featuring half a dozen buff and beautiful Australian men) is either injecting life into a moribund art or is just a lame excuse to watch sweaty beefcake. But it might be more accurate to describe the show as rock’n’roll tap, since it has all the charms – and limitations – of the music that inspired it.

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Parkview Apartments, the nondescript four-storey walk-up at 2255 Pandora in Vancouver looks fine from the outside, but it’s the sort of building where cockroaches aren’t nervous.

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The University of British Columbia is being sued by an Ontario-based author who claims the school breached a contract by failing to provide her with a safe working environment while she was Green College’s journalist-in-residence in fall 2004.

Green College is unique at UBC: a traditional-style residence with a good dining hall that is designed to bring a mix of interdisciplinary grad students, post-doctoral fellows, visiting professors, and visiting scholars together to exchange ideas.

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Ever since I saw the film Kate and Leopold, any invitation to dinner-and-a-movie has taken on a sinister tone.

K&L, which is currently topping the hot videos lists, is the latest in a growing roster of "dick flicks". You know what I mean: those romantic comedies that are marketed to women as chick flicks but often seem designed to insult us. Or worse: they reflect the way some man wants women to behave. In short, they could only have been dreamed up by some dick. Or, if it’s really bad, a committee of dicks.

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When John Alleyne took the helm at Ballet British Columbia (BBC) in 1992, he envisaged an innovative company that went beyond tutus and frou-frou. He promised a “contemporary classical” repertoire that showcased the world’s finest new choreographers and twentieth century masters -- and absolutely no Nutcracker. It’s absence was to be the symbol distinguishing BBC from more conventional troupes.

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